Grant Recipient

Wakefield Run Stream Restoration Project Revives Watershed in Fairfax County

Volunteers participate in a groundbreaking ceremony for the Wakefield Run Stream Restoration Project.

About Wakefield Run Stream Restoration Project

In order to prevent Wakefield Run streambeds and banks from further erosion and from sending sediment into Accotink Creek – a watershed in Fairfax County – the Fairfax County Park Foundation launched the Wakefield Run Stream Restoration Project.

The Wakefield Run Stream Restoration Project is part of an ongoing effort by the Fairfax County Park Foundation to improve the quality of the county’s surface waters and restore streams and stream valleys.  As part of the restoration project, segments of Accotink Creek were graded, stabilized and planted in order to prevent further erosion.  Completed in March 2014, the Wakefield Run Stream Restoration Project was the one of the first restorations in Accotink Creek.

“The Wakefield Run Stream Restoration Project provides safer and easier access to a remote area of the county during all seasons of the year,” says Margaret Thaxton, Director of Development for the Fairfax County Park Foundation.  “The newly stabilized stream crossings are used by walkers, hikers, runners, mountain bikers and park and utility company service vehicles.  More importantly – the improved water quality can be enjoyed by everyone in the Chesapeake Bay watershed.”

The water quality benefits realized on a yearly basis by the Wakefield Run Stream Restoration Project include the removal of 40 pounds of phosphorous, 494 pounds of nitrogen and 76,000 pounds of suspended solids. 

495 Express Lanes Grant Program Support

The grant funds provided by Transurban enabled the planting of native trees and vegetative cover in the project area.  The plantings provided the project area with environmental sustainability, hill stabilization and an improved visual appearance for all stream valley users.

“The Wakefield Run Stream Restoration Project is another excellent example of how government agencies, local businesses, dedicated volunteers and corporations – like Transurban – can work together to accomplish something that individually would not have been possible,” says Thaxton.

Staff from the partnering agencies and organizations, as well as local residents, will continue to monitor the quality of Wakefield Run in order to keep the area visually appealing to all stream valley users.

More Information

To find out more about the Fairfax County Park Foundation and ways to get involved, visit http://www.fairfaxparkfoundation.org/.  To learn more about the stream restoration, visit http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/nvswcd/streamrestore.htm.